As you probably know, there are a lot of pre-health students on every college campus across the country. There are many with dreams to work in a field where they can help others and help themselves. However, not everyone who was once “pre-health” make it into the industry. In fact, only about 40 percent of students who apply to medical school each year get accepted. To make matters worse, a majority of students do not even make it to the point where they can even apply. So why is this? Why do some students succeed in becoming a doctor while others seem to fail? Of course, there is not one definitive answer as it depends on a variety of factors. But we can get a glimpse into why some students do not make it by studying characteristics of people who fail.

In an article published by inc.com, author Geoffrey James talks about the reasons people may fail. The article was not intended for “pre-health” students, but it definitely does apply to them (or anyone for that matter).

1. Uninspiring Goal

This is a common one for pre-health students. Many pre-health students decide to pursue medicine because of some “things” such as money, fame, and respect. However, these factors itself will not be enough to motivate someone to go through the challenging educational process of becoming a doctor. You must have a deeper reason for why you want to pursue a career in this field, something that goes beyond any-“thing.”

2. Fear of Failing

As a pre-health student, there are times when you probably will fail. Whether it is in the form of a bad grade, or a rejection for a research position, you will fail at something, sometime, guaranteed. However, if you let that fear drive you, then you will not take the necessary risks to become successful. Do not fear failure, but try to view failure as a stepping stone to something greater.

3. Fear of Success

Now this one is an interesting one and is one that people do not focus on as much as the fear of failing. However, according to James, this is an important concept to address. Some people fear that if they become successful, it will change who they are, it will change how people view them, and eventually change their whole lives. What if they don’t want that change? Because of these thoughts, there are people who try to sabotage themselves so that they would not succeed. Instead of having this fear, try to learn to be happy in any situation. This way, whether successful or not, you will have contentment in knowing everything is alright; your situations should not affect your happiness, but the way you view your situations should.

4. An Unrealistic Timetable

This is another big one for pre-health students. Most pre-health students start off being extremely ambitious and exceptionally idealistic. Therefore, they set high goals for themselves, goals which are often unattainable. And when they do not reach them, they become discouraged and it affects their schoolwork. Take precaution and make sure to set realistic goals and a realistic timetable.

5. Worrying About “Dry Spots”

“Dry Spots,” according to James, refers to phases in life when people may feel like nothing is working or they are not advancing towards their goal. The process of being a doctor is a long one and there are surely going to be times when people have “dry spots.” However, you cannot let this discourage you. Just try the best that you can in those stages and know that it will soon pass.

Now that you know some of the characteristics of people who may fail, it is now important for you to address these issues. Ask yourselves if you struggle with any of these five elements. If so, talk to a friend or counselor and have them help you through the mental battles. Obviously, just because you don’t struggle with any of these mean you are guaranteed success, nor is the vice versa true. But it is more likely that you will fail if you possess some of these characteristics. Becoming a doctor is hard, don’t let your mental disposition make it harder.

You can view the original article here.

The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of ProspectiveDoctor. Follow ProspectiveDoctor on Twitter @ProspectiveDr

Tags

Guest Author

This article was written by a guest author. ProspectiveDoctor highly encourages guest authors to contribute their work to ProspectiveDoctor. If you are interested in guest posting or becoming a volunteer staff writer, click on "Contribute to PDr" on the front page menu to learn more.

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button